July racing update

July was a very busy month at the yard. Avenue du Monde (Champs-Elysees) ran her final race, we attended the Tattersalls Horses in Training sales in Newmarket, two new horses entered the yard from claiming races – Never Compromise (Astronomer Royal) and Surewecan (Royal Applause) – and we ran the racing festival in Vichy.

Avenue du Monde’s last race

Avenue du Monde’s last race before becoming a broodmare was in Vichy on the 20th of the month, the last day of the festival. We were hoping that she would drop to the third division of the handicap that day but ended up in the second with Grey Sensation (Aussie Rules) and Gascon (Heliostatic).  Gascon proved to be the best of the three on the day finishing a good second while Grey picked up fourth and Avenue was just out of the money at sixth.  By then, we were running on a turf that was well worn from the week of racing and the heavy rain that fell the Monday before and again that day.

Ray Of Hope finds his form

Earlier in the month, we took Ray of Hope (Layman) back to Deauville and the fibersand and he ran much better than his previous outing at Longchamp. This time picking up second place, one of two that he would run this month.

Ray of Hope earing the yard its 19th second-place finish of the year in Deauville, the 31 July 2018.

Further notable runs included Gascon again, finishing fifth at Compiegne, Never Compromise was seventh in a Quinte handicap and Mr. Chuckles (Arcano) adding a seventh in the second division of that same Quinte handicap.

The Mickaëls – Forest, and Barzalona – did most of the riding except for Mr. Chuckles who was ridden by Delphine Santiago and Maxime Guyon who rode Gascon in Compiegne.

The best paying horse in July was Ray of Hope with his second place on 4 July, paying €9,90 for a one euro place bet.

King Driver retires

King will leave a void that will be difficult to fill.

So we have come to this day, after all. King Driver (Domedriver and Queenmara out of King Of Clubs) has been officially retired, and the yard has an empty space that is far bigger than King’s box.

King has been our standard-bearer for nearly nine years. He leaves us with six wins and 25 places from 55 starts, and many, many memories, both wonderful and challenging. I didn’t train him, he trained me.

King Driver at the 2010 Osarus yearling sales at La Teste.

He was the first (and still only) yearling an owner trusted me to buy at the sales. He taught me about tapeworms, flat feet, pirouettes, broken bones (and how you could discover them years after the fact), the importance of jockey choice (he just simply refused to move when he disagreed), how to load a horse in the truck (one large German with a huge yell will do the trick), how to spot ghosts (but still, only he could see them), gelding (don’t wait, just do it), but mostly how an incredibly beautiful chestnut with an eight-meter stride length and a heart that no one could match can glide to the finish line first when all the stars align.

We will miss you very much, King.

“It is very emotional coming to the end of the ‘King’ era. Right from the start, finding Gina on-line (she loved horses/was vocally anti-drugs/spoke English – well nearly!) buying the outstanding King by video-streamed auction whist on the phone to Gina at Osiris and following King’s outstanding career whilst sharing a few bottles of champagne and Mojitos. He loved Cagnes-Sur-Mer and the town liked King. We like characters and King was surely that – see my wife Jean’s chewed finger. There can be no better stables in France – friendly, dedicated and successful. Gina, we look forward to your future success and hosting you, Tim & team in Guernsey where you can get your second? international winner. Love and success to you all.”
Steve Butterworth, owner.

King Driver winning the Prix de Juan-les-Pins in Cagnes-sur-Mer, February 14, 2015. (Scoopdyga)

“Thank you Gina, it’s been a great experience and we were blessed that we found you and had all our faith in you finding him when everyone said “ there’s no future in a ‘driver’ “. Your yard and your team are what all owners look for! Much love and luck.”
Steve Camm, owner.

QZ wins a Quinté

Quiet Zain easily taking the Prix d’Antibes Quinté handicap.

Quiet Zain (Youmzain) won the Prix d’Antibes Quinté handicap February 17, 2018, in Cagnes-sur-Mer. It was a first for him and for the yard.  Michael Forest placed him in perfect position behind the leaders and pulled out in the stretch with plenty of horse to leave the field behind.

QZ, as he’s known at the yard, had the perfect draw at 6 in the fifteen-horse field and was quickly placed behind the leaders, drafting number 13 – Fair Trade (Tertullian)  – who would end up with 5th place.

The race took place on the fibersand track over a distance of 2400 meters (1.5 miles). Time of the race was 2’29”58. Quiet Zain paid 8.40 euros to win.

Video replay of the race

 

Labor pains

The pheasant that could have ended my life this morning chose not to, for which I was grateful. Far away into my own thoughts, I didn’t see him preening alongside the trail until the last second – Hard Way was nearly on top of him, bowling along toward home in a huge extended trot. Too late to stop, all I could do was crouch lower to the saddle and hope he didn’t choose that second to fly off, which would have resulted in me flying too, probably straight into a stone wall. The pheasant stayed put, and Hard Way coasted past – he probably didn’t see him, either.

Continue reading “Labor pains”

Worth the Trip

The night we were loading up to head south for our annual trek to Cagnes sur Mer in the depths of darkest January, I was thinking to myself, “I’m not doing this again. This is too hard on everyone.”

First came two stalls packed to the top with everything we need to train and race 10 horses for six weeks. Water buckets, feed buckets, saddles, bridles, rugs – oh, the rugs. Winter coats for cold nights, lighter polars for sunny days, exercise sheets, rain sheets, presentations sheets, saddle cloths…it was endless. And of course, the hay steamer had to go. And the wheelbarrow. Forks, brooms, bandages….and then, of course the horses. After nearly two hours of loading, we were exhausted and then we had to get US down. Two by train, one by car, baggage wherever it would fit.

But then Cagnes works its magic. We arrived to full sun, palm trees, an azure sea, mimosa about to bloom – a fabulous place to work. By the time the horses were tucked in their new boxes, our tack and feed rooms set up and we were installed in the sun at the cantine around a great lunch and a bottle of rosé any doubts about the trip were far behind us. The weather cooperated this year, unlike last year, when we were pelted with endless days of rain. The horses, for the most part, cooperated, too. They did what they were supposed to do. They soaked up the sun, ate like they were on vacation and worked like champions. We won three races and placed six times, for total earnings topping 65,000 euros and our best meeting so far in the five years I’ve been making the trek.

There were some disappointments, of course. Barbe a Box never ran a decent race and his owner got fed up and moved him to another trainer. Fair enough, but the horse needs gelding, and until that happens, I’m not looking for a miracle on the racetrack. We had to stop with Pahlavan because his wobbler’s syndrome made him too dangerous to continue. Gorki Park told us yet again that while he is fine with sun, he doesn’t like the sand. And Risk Well Taken is still fighting with us about whether she wants to be a racehorse. The jury’s still out on that one. But the others picked up the slack. Ray of Hope won his comeback race and then won again, just to make sure he’d keep his place in the first string. Not to be outdone, King Driver came up with the goods, and Moughjim, Eternal Gift and Impulsive American all took home checks.

When the season ended, we didn’t want to come home (not least because it meant packing up everything we’d brought down). But it wasn’t just the wonderful weather that was making us drag our heels. Last year, when we got home almost everybody got sick, horses and humans alike. It took us six months (and a hay steamer) to get the ship righted. Reality and the racing calendar meant that we had to go home, so we did. But what a difference a little sun makes. This year, everybody got home same and healthy, and we saw the proof yesterday at St. Cloud: we scored our first double when King Driver and Gorki Park both won their races, taking advantage of the fitness they build in Cagnes. Moughjim also was in the money again in Lyon. Only Ray of Hope told us he really didn’t want to leave Cagnes. He was never traveling when he ran in Deauville last week, but the fiber track there is a considerably harder surface than the track in Cagnes, and he never found his action. We’ll try him on a yielding turf course and he’ll find his winning form again.

We’ve had five winners so far this year, which puts us ahead of all of last year, and we’re just getting started. Spring is finally coming to Paris, and we’re ready for la vie en rose!

Gallop France Winners

Avenue du Monde

(Champs Elysees and Marla by Pentire)

Avenue du Monde had enough to win the Prix des Hauteurs de la Solle, March 17, 2017. (Scoopdyga)
Avenue du Monde wins again in 2017, this time in Vichy.
Her first race in foal, Avenue du Monde caught Santorina at the post in the Prix Wemyss Bight in St Cloud, June 15, 2018.

Bleu Astral

Bleu Astral winning the Prix de l Aisne in Compiègne for High Street Racing, March 27, 2017.

Casquito

CASQUITO (Delphine Santiago) easing past the winning post to take the Prix Equipement du Cavalier – Hippolia (Prix des Pervenches) (Course 7), June 25, 2015 at Deauville-Clairefontaine. (Photo by Frédéric Vernichon.)

Copper Baked

Copper Baked won the first of the double on the last day of racing in Vichy.

Deep Ocean

Deep Ocean’s second consecutive win, the Prix President Nebon-Carle, Lyon Carré-de-Soie, March 21, 2013.

Doctor Sim

Doctor Sim takes the Prix Perigord while King Driver follows closely for fourth. (Scoopdyga)

Eternal Gift

Eternal Gift taking the Prix de la Roche in Deauville, December 21, 2015. ScoopDyga

Gorki Park

Gorki Park winning at St Cloud for the second time in 2015 taking the Prix d’Anjou on October 2. Jacques YeSse
Not to be outdone, Gorki Park winning the Prix Crécy Saint James one hour later. (ScoopDyga)
Gorki Park, win photo, May 2013, St. Cloud, France.
Gorki Park, pulling ahead at the finish line in St Cloud, May 2013

Hi Shinko

Hi Shinko crossing the finish line first in February, Prix du Val Fleur-les-Vespins. Scoop Dyga.

Hard Way

Hard Way winning the Prix Du Vieux Colombier Handicap over 3,100 meters at Longchamp July 6. Photo by John Gilmore
Hard Way winning the Prix Du Vieux Colombier Handicap over 3,100 meters at Longchamp July 6. Photo by John Gilmore
Hard Way running away with the Prix Lomagnes at St Cloud, May 2012.

King Driver

King Driver winning just ahead of Grey Sensation in the Prix de Marseille Vivaux February 27, 2017. (André Viguier)
King Driver taking the Prix du Lavandou, February 8, 2017. Andre VIGUIER
King Driver easing ahead to take the Prix Herblay. (ScoopDyga)
King Driver winning the Prix de Juan-les-Pins in Cagnes-sur-mer, Febuary 14, 2015. (Scoopdyga)

Mouhjim

Mouhjim winning again in the Prix de Marseille Vivaux, February 20, 2017. (André Viguier)
Moujhim winning the Prix Janine Lefevre Winkfield February 12, 2017.

Parkori

Parkori taking the Prix Duc d’Alburqurque in St Cloud, June 28, 2015.

Quiet Zain

Quiet Zain easing across the post first, Cagnes sur Mer, January 2018.
Winner of the Prix Polygone Saint Jean, February 11, 2017. (André Viguier)

Ray of Hope

Ray of Hope taking his second straight win, the Prix de l’Esterel, February 11, 2015, Cagnes-sur-mer. (Scoopdyga)

 

One Two Punch:
Ray Of Hope edging out stable mate Mouhjim to take the Prix d’Ostende in Cagnes-sur-mer, January 22, 2015.

Surrey Storm

Surrey Storm taking the the prix Alec Weisweiller, April 1 2012 in Lisieux.

Turfani

Turfani (center, white cap) winning in Deauville.

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming…

I haven’t had a runner over the sticks in several years, since I decided I’d rather concentrate on the flat because frankly, I don’t have the stomach for the risks involved to horse and rider. That said, I do have a lot of respect for the discipline and I love to watch the best jumpers in action, which is something that will happen next week when attention turns to the Cheltenham festival in England. Why am I taking time out from my usual blogging to look at Cheltenham, you might ask? Two reasons.

The first, and most important, is that a friend of mine, Sally Anne Grassick, is one of the riders in the Saint Patrick’s Derby, a race to be run during the festival to raise money for cancer research. Sally Anne is a journalist who spreads her time between Equidia, the French racing channel, and various publications, including the Jour de Galop and its offshoot in English, the French Daily News. I sometimes lend a hand translating the French Daily News, which is how I got to meet Sally. She is also an amateur jockey in France and was one of the 12 chosen to ride in the Cheltenham race next Thursday. Sally is just shy of her goal of raising 15,000 pounds for her cause, so lend her a hand and make a donation. It’s very easily done online, and every bit helps.

Sally Anne will be sporting the famous JP McManus silks, which brings me to the second reason I’m interested in Cheltenham. A friend of mine was instrumental in selling a French horse to McManus called Another Sensation, who is entered in the Fred Winter Handicap Hurdle next Wednesday. According to the latest betting on the upcoming Cheltenham festival, he’s a bit of a long shot, but I wouldn’t rule him out. A few of us over here will definitely be rooting for him. (Oh, and just an aside – that link on the odds takes you to our friends at Paddy Power, who also have a nifty next-Pope book going. Ya gotta love it!)

I’ve been to Cheltenham a few times, and it is an amazing few days of racing. The crowds are unbelievable – it once took me three hours just to get out of the parking lot. Turned out I wasn’t as clever as I had thought when I snagged that close-up spot in the owners and trainers lot. Once you get in, you can’t get out! So I’ll be happy to follow it along at home. Watching it, though, will probably inspire me to send my own string out jumping a bit. We do like to train over hurdles occasionally, just to build back muscle and sharpen them up overall. But I think I’ll leave the actual racing to the specialists.

Sales behind, runners ahead

It was busy at the end of last week with the La Teste sales and Birs in Lyon. First Birs: He finished 8th, but ran very, very well despite bad traffic. He was drawn 3, and Flavien had to fight with him to keep him from galloping on top of the other horses. (When you want the outside, you get the inside, and vice-versa, it seems.) Birs is a very, very big horse and wasn’t very happy inside. Once Flavien got him out, he galloped on to close nicely, and was only beaten about three lengths. In any case, the owner wanted him sold, so I made a deal with another trainer and he has now left my yard. He will run in Maisons-Laffitte next week, I hope, and I’ll still get the trainer’s percentage even if I don’t get to race him under my name. There are 80 entries, so we’ll see if he gets a run. He’s a nice horse, though, and one to watch.

As for the sales, the quality of horses on offer from Osarus is better than ever and there were some very nice yearlings through the ring. One of my owners did a bit of bidding and came away with nothing, and it was frustrating not to be able to bring a couple home. I particularly liked Lots 34, 78 and 93 – all very different styles of horses. No. 34 was a Layman colt who looked like he could race tomorrow. Very precocious and compact, he sold for 8,000 euros to Delcher-Sanchez, a trainer in Southern France or Spain – not sure which. No. 78 was a Great Journey filly, whose sister was a Listed-placed filly in Switzerland and France. She was a lovely model and went to Con Marnane for 11,500 euros, which means she is likely to come back to race in France (although I have no idea if she’ll come to me – my guess is probably not). My favorite horse of the sales was No. 93, a Carlotamix colt that went for only 11,000 to Michel Gentile. I figured he would have gone for a lot more, so maybe I missed a problem of some sort. Two of his three siblings are Listed winners and he was a nice horse, if a bit on the light side. The weak spot on the page, like it is for many French-bred horses, is the sire, of course. He did win the Group 1 Criterium International at St. Cloud, but didn’t do much else. He has eight winners from 45 foals of racing age, and he usually doesn’t get very good mares.

France suffers from a lack of decent sires, but it’s a vicious circle because breeders aren’t willing to pay high stud fees. The highest stallions in France stand for 15,000 euros, and that’s peanuts compared with many other places; Carlotamix stands for 2,500 euros.

In any case, it will be interesting to follow my three yearling picks to see what becomes of them.

The organization of the sales was excellent; the Osarus gang is the antithesis of the Arqana snobbery that goes on in Deauville. The Osarus team is very welcoming, and they put on free breakfast and lunch the morning of the sale, plus Champagne during the sales themselves (they’re not stupid – well-oiled buyers tend to drive up prices!). I’ll definitely be back.

In racing this week, George (Email Exit) will go to St. Cloud for a handicap on Thursday. I really need to retire him and find him a new job, but since I haven’t really moved on that yet and he’s here, eating, cantering and seeming well enough, he can race until I decide what to do with him. Tuna (Fortunateencounter) will go to a claimer here in Maisons-Laffitte on Friday. She was entered in a handicap at St. Cloud on Thursday but didn’t make the cut, so we’ll have to take another risk. Rue B. is entered in the same race, but I don’t think we may wait for a better chance for her.

Oh (expletives deleted)

It all started with a f*cking flu shot. A day later, Triple Tonic started coughing. No big deal, we thought; she’s a two-year-old having a bit of a reaction. A little vitamin C, slow down for a few days and it will all be fine. But she didn’t get better. After about two weeks of intermittent coughing, in a completely unrelated incident, she decided to unhook her metal water bucket with her head, necessitating five stitches (and a change to a plastic bucket). Fine. She had to have antibiotics for this, so maybe we kill two birds with one stone and clear up the cough. One week and seven injections later, her head was perfectly healed, but she was still coughing, and the stuff coming out of her nose was not pretty. A sample was sent off to the lab, the vet was sure he had the right antibiotic and we started again. Ten days later, no change. Off to the clinic for a scope and possibly a head x-ray to make sure it wasn’t in her sinuses. Bad scope, but clean sinuses, another lab test and a third kind of antibiotic. No luck, but poor Tonic was starting to feel like a pin cushion.

Meanwhile, despite doing our best to keep her isolated and disinfect everything that came in contact with her, King next door started coughing, and Rue B down the line thought she might join in. We put all the horses on a course of a broad spectrum antibiotic to try to contain things. I have never, ever done this because I hate to compromise the immune system and contribute to the development of resistant strains of crap. But this time it seemed called for. Triple Tonic, meanwhile, will move to the country tomorrow for an old-fashioned, unpleasant but effective treatment: The “abces de fixation,” a provoked abscess in the chest cavity that draws all the nasty stuff into it and is then drained. It’s akin to leeches, and for me it is definitely a method of last resort. But pumping more chemicals into this poor filly’s system just seems the wrong way to go.

King obviously is a scratch for his debut tomorrow; we’ve given him a second dose of Iodure, an IV iodine designed to clean out the respiratory system. He will be rescoped on Thursday, when we’ll send swabs to the lab. So far, it looks like we might catch him before it’s too far gone. He’s also more advanced in his work, and might have a stronger immune system. Let’s hope. Rue B, too, seems to be fighting it off. For now, all the horses that have raced seem fine. They are tougher and older, so they might not come down with…whatever it is this is.